Jul 05, 2020Hiking out

Bushwhacking my way out wasn’t easy. It took me three-quarters of an hour to hike less than a mile from my campsite back to the Farm Track Trail. Back near the trail junction, the lake had dropped enough for parts of the trail that had been underwater on Friday to now be visible again. Of course, the lower parts of the trail are still underwater (and yes you might have seen the pictures above before, I used them to illustrate my hike in when I couldn’t use my cameras because of the rain).

All of this was flooded on Friday. Piney Creek Wilderness – Day Three. Copyright © 2020 Gary Allman, all rights reserved.

Back at the Farm Track Trail, and I was already soaked to the skin in sweat. I was tempted to just dump myself in the creek to cool off (it wouldn’t be the first time).

Gary on the Lake Trail at Piney Creek Wilderness. Piney Creek Wilderness – Day Three. Copyright © 2020 Gary Allman, all rights reserved.

Continuing the tradition, I took a selfie by one of the downed trees on the Farm Track Trail. As I’ve pointed out before, this is not representative of what the best-dressed hiker/backpackers would be seen wearing, but my choice of clothing is comfortable in the 90°F weather I’m hiking in. And of course, as always, “It’s my hike.” 🙂

Not the same tree – but it is sort of traditional to take a picture here, somewhere. Note that my shirt is completely soaked again. Sweat, not rain this time. Piney Creek Wilderness – Day Three. Copyright © 2020 Gary Allman, all rights reserved.
Stock pond and pines. Piney Creek Wilderness – Day Three. Copyright © 2020 Gary Allman, all rights reserved.

Back at the trailhead, and I’m the only one here, though the trash scattered around suggests some uncouth people have been here while I was on my hike.

The only vehicle at the Pineview Trailhead. Piney Creek Wilderness – Day Three. Copyright © 2020 Gary Allman, all rights reserved.
End of Trip Selfie – Changed ready for the road. Piney Creek Wilderness – Day Three. Copyright © 2020 Gary Allman, all rights reserved.

How did it go?

  • It was a great trip and just what I needed.
  • My food on this trip was quite different. I carried some canned food (beans and hotdogs). I took dehydrated potatoes and sachets of chicken and tuna. I had a Mountain House Egg and Bacon breakfast. I don’t know what it is about the Breakfast Skillet and the Eggs and Bacon, but both meals disagree with me. So, tasty as they are to eat, I’m not buying them again. The main issue with my food choice was that it was bulky and heavy. The empty cans, crushed, still took up a lot of space in my pack.
  • The Cat Can stove is growing on me. It is so light, small, and quick to use, it’s a great back-up to my wood stove, especially when conditions are really wet.
  • Sitting and relaxing was just what I needed. Being able to swim whenever I got too hot was great.
  • Despite the fact that no-one ventured into my little bit of Piney Creek, the noise from the boats and July 4th parties still reached me very clearly. At one point I thought a motorboat was in the creek area (motorized vehicle are prohibited, not that that stops anyone). I took a swim out to see where they were, only to discover there was no one there!
  • We’ll not mention the noise of all the fireworks.
  • Bushwhacking out, I got caught in some nasty briars, and had to cut myself out at one point. That sort of bushwhacking does not treat my gear kindly.
Copyright © 2020 Gary Allman, all rights reserved.

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